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Empowering People to Empower People with Louis Alloro, MAPP

Empowering People to Empower People with Louis Alloro, MAPP

How do you empower people to empower other people? The more I talk to people about positive psychology, the more I realize that the thing that most people want to know is how they can become a change agent themselves. In this episode, I interview Louis Alloro, a shining star in applied positive psychology who I had the honor of learning from for seven months during my time studying at The Flourishing Center in Los Angeles. Louis and I talk about how to really create sustainable positive change in an organization through systems. We also talk about the following topics:

  • Listening to what your heart and body need.
  • Being the change is starting with yourself
  • The best way to help others is by starting by helping yourself
  • Self care is health care and it is not selfish
  • Fill your cup, have fun, be still
  • Louis’ focus on integrity and how important it is to be true to yourself first “the universe hears what you mean, not what you say”
  • Give yourself permission to be human and be present with what is.
  • As a leader, we should envision the best possible futures for our people and remember the people in the middle as integral agents of change. The best leaders see others as co-leaders and the boss doesn’t have all the answers.
  • Don’t wait for something to be different to be happy now. Your happiness will boost you along the way to your goals.

So much goodness came from this episode. It was an amazing conversation that I wish could have only been longer. Please listen and share with your friends who want to lead the change that they want to see in the world!

Listen to this episode on your favorite podcast app:

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More about Louis Alloro:

For over a decade, Louis has been working as a change-agent (coach, trainer and facilitator) in organizational, community, and city wide interventions. Louis is co-founder of The Flourishing Center’s Certificate in Applied Positive Psychology (CAPP) program which has trained close to 2,000 practitioners since 2012. He is one of the first 100 people in the world to earn a Master of Applied Positive Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania where he developed a framework for social-emotional leadership. Today, he consults in learning organizations to optimize culture, wellbeing, engagement, and performance using scientifically informed tools and strategies. He is a senior fellow at the Center for the Advancement of Wellbeing, an interdisciplinary research and teaching center whose mission is to catalyze human wellbeing by promoting the science and practices that lead to lives of vitality, purpose, and resilience.  He is currently pursuing his PhD in positive organizational psychology and social impact evaluation at Claremont Graduate University. His new partnership is with Michelle McQuaid with whom he is launching a new program this fall: Certificate in Creating Positive Change, a 12 week program for change agents to learn some of the tools and frameworks that make facilitating positive change more effective, supportive and fun! 

You can find Louis here:

Connect with Louis and Michelle McQuaid at The Change Lab.

Connect with Louis at The Flourishing Center.

Connect with Louis on his website.

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Making the World a Happier Place Through Elevated Customer Experiences with Scott Porter

Making the World a Happier Place Through Elevated Customer Experiences with Scott Porter

Businesses and brands have an amazing opportunity to create a positive experience for people who interact with them. Scott is on a mission to help businesses to create more happiness in the world through optimal customer experience. In today’s episode, I speak with Scott Porter about how he has taken his passion for street tacos and combined it with his passion for fantastic customer experience. He believes that we can make the world a happier place by increasing the amount of positive customer experiences. He has started with his artisan churro business San Diablo Artisan Churros, and is now interviewing CEOs about how they make positive customer experience a priority. Scott says we are moving from a transactional economy into a relationship economy and that every relationship touchpoint is critical for your business to thrive. 

Listen to episode 104 here:

Find Scott Porter here:

Website: 

http://searchfortheperfecttaco.com

Instagram: 

https://www.instagram.com/searchfortheperfecttaco/

https://www.instagram.com/Tacoincidence/

LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/scottcraigporter/

Scott Porter has eaten thousands of tacos in a relentless worldwide search for the perfect taco where he’s found the secrets to unlocking the power of brand and customer experience to thrive. He founded and currently owns and operates Utah’s only gourmet churro business, San Diablo Artisan Churros — delivering deep-fried happiness to over 1,500 celebrations since late 2016 and winning back-to-back Best of State for pastries. Scott is a seasoned entrepreneur and leader having been the executive director of two nursing homes and a home health agency, co-founded as the CMO the first all-you-can-fly membership airline called Surf Air, co-founded and launched the game of Reverse Charades, co-founded an international non-profit organization called Singular Humanitarian and has been a management consultant with Gartner (formerly CEB), InsideOut Development and General Assembly.  He holds a B.A. in public relations and an M.B.A. in international business, marketing and entrepreneurship both from BYU as well as an M.A. in Spanish from California State University-Sacramento. Scott was born in Arizona, raised in Canada, is from Las Vegas and has lived and worked in Guatemala, Costa Rica, Peru and Mexico. 

There are networkers and then there are super connectors. Scott is one of the very few gifted super connectors that I know. He is just an all-around amazing person who exudes positive vibes and I’m stoked to have him on the show. Don’t miss this episode!

How To Live To Be 99, Backed By My Grandma (and Science)

How To Live To Be 99, Backed By My Grandma (and Science)

This week my grandma turned 99.

WOW! It was a very special day for her and for our whole family. Not many people live that long. I am amazed at how long she has lived and love hearing the wisdom from someone who just entered her 100th year of life! I can’t stop bragging about it. Amazing. But how does one live longer? Unfortunately, I didn’t get any audio from my grandma today, but I already set up a time to record her next week where we will go into depth about how she has lived well the last 99 years.

All of this inspired me to talk about the research from National Geographic’s Dan Buettner on the Blue Zones as well as Elizabeth Blackburn’s Nobel Prize-winning research on telomeres and aging. Do you want to live longer? Well, these tips could add at least another 10 years to your life. Science shows it and so does Grandma.

To listen to this week’s episode, click the play button below or listen on my podcast on any of your favorite podcast apps below:

More Happy Life on Apple Podcasts.

More Happy Life on Google Play.

More Happy Life on Overcast.

More Happy Life on Pocket Casts.

As a quick review, here are the 9 tips I talk about in the podcast:

  1. Move Naturally
  2. Purpose
  3. Downshift
  4. The 80% Rule for eating
  5. Eat more plants than animals
  6. Wine at 5
  7. Belong
  8. Loved Ones First
  9. Find the Right Tribe

Science of How to live longer and happier - Longevity research - More Happy Life Podcast

Olympic Mindsets for the Race of Life with Olympic Marathoner Jared Ward

Olympic Mindsets for the Race of Life with Olympic Marathoner Jared Ward

Quick Summary of Episode 66

This week’s episode is an interview with Olympic marathon runner Jared Ward. Marathons are so commonly used as metaphors for life, so I thought it would be powerful to interview an actual olympic marathon runner to see how the research in positive psychology lines up with the marathon running of someone who has run on a United States Olympic team in the Olympics. I learned SO much from Jared on our call. Here are just a few:

  • The can do mindset and being empowered by the reality that the best possible outcome CAN happen.
  • Being present in your mind by repeating mindful phrases over and over.
  • Success comes from the scaffolding of your relationships
  • The powerful galvanizing effect of making important decisions once.
  • Feeling a sense of calling in life may not just come to you, but you might just have to choose it.
  • Doing YOUR best rather than being THE best.
To listen to this week’s episode, click the play button below or listen on my podcast on any of your favorite podcast apps below:

More Happy Life on Apple Podcasts.

More Happy Life on Google Play.

More Happy Life on Overcast.

More Happy Life on Pocket Casts.

This interview with Jared was so amazing so I wanted to give you even more of the juicy details and show notes below. I learned a lot from him and it made me want to solidify my own decisions more like he has. Here are some of the highlights I took away from our conversation:

  • He talked about a “can do mindset” where he is empowered by the reality that it CAN happen instead of thinking about all the things that could go wrong. These pringiples were inspired by sports psychologist Craig Manning, and have helped Jared outperform himself, which Jared says is the key.
  • He also talked about the power of being present. I asked him about how he keeps his mind occupied during the race. I didn’t mention this during the interview, but Jared’s best time in the marathon was 2 hours, 11 minutes and 30 seconds (AMAZINGLY FAST), but that also means that he has that much time for his mind to wander. This made me so curious what he thinks about during the race. So I asked him and he said that he just works on staying present. He mentioned a few things that he occupies his mind with: Breathe, look at the guy in front of me, relax my shoulders, stand up tall, swing my arms, ease into the pace. Sound simple? Go try to run a marathon like Jared! 🙂
  • Another powerful strategy Jared talked about was to focus on three things that went well during the race. As soon as the race ends, before any critiques, he thinks about three things that he did well. Then at the starting line of every important race, he focuses on these things instead of on the things he could have done better.
  • We talked about flow experience with regards to competitive distance running. He said this: “All the best races happen when all the other switches kind of turn off and I’m just racing.” This really reminded me of so many things that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi teaches about the anatomy of flow. All the other switches turn off and you are just in the moment, fully engaged.
  • Talent + (Mentors + Family/Friends) = SUCCESS. I was very impressed by how humble Jared was about his success. He talked about what he called the “scaffolding” of success. He said: “Our success is like a stack of Jenga blocks and if you take too many of them our, the whole thing comes tumbling down.” How true is that?! He said that he believed that he was dealt a royal flush in terms of being able to be a runner.
  • When Jared spoke about what he called the “galvanizing effect” of decision making, my ears opened wide. This is HUGE! He said that at first, regardless of the talent he may have had, he just didn’t love running. He looked at his job and he loved it. He looked at his relationship with his wife and family and he loved that. But when he was spending so much time in these incredibly taxing workouts, he just didn’t love that. Until he made the decision. He said that there was a point where he told his coach that he wanted to quit. But his coach told him that, among other things, he needed to pray about it first. So he did. And after praying about it, he felt that God really confirmed his being a runner, so he decided to commit. After this decision was made, things got more fun for Jared. He said: “This is what I’m supposed to do so I’m going to keep running up against that wall until the wall falls down.”
  • He emphasized his relationship with God as “the biggest thing in life.” It is interesting how many olympic athletes draw strength from meaning derived from a higher power. I loved Jared’s conviction in this aspect of his life. It’s also cool to interview a fellow Mormon who also served a mission like me.
  • The last thing we talked about was the bad advice that he hears being given all the time. He lamented the fact that our culture really supports the notion of being “the best.” He said that he didn’t like this because it’s not realistic and doesn’t help you become your best. “I wish there was more emphasis on doing your best as opposed to emphasis on being the best.”

To follow Jared to the marathon podiums he talked about as his goals (and hopefully to the Tokyo Olympics in 2020!) find Jared on Twitter (@Jwardy21) and on Instagram (@Jwardy21). 

 

Cover image credit: Jared Ward

Race image credit: Bjorn Paree

 

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